Inclusive Growth

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24 July 2019

6 tips for studying abroad in Europe

(From ec.europa.eu ) Organise your course selection in advance If possible, you should organise the specifics of your course and credits before travelling to your chosen university or college. If you’re going on an exchange, the administrative processes may be different to those of your home institution, so it may take some time to understand how things work. Having a plan in place before you arrive means you can avoid unnecessary stress in the already demanding first days of your study abroad programme. Ask questions A great way to prepare yourself for your study abroad is to ask people who...
16 July 2019

6 steps to starting a professional career abroad: Part 3

(From ec.europa.eu ) Step #5: Moving abroad Moving abroad is a big step, but with a bit of planning you can smooth the transition and make the process less intimidating. What should I think about before moving? Work contract: You should receive a copy of your employment contract and confirmation of your salary before you leave. Important documentation: Make copies of your important documents (e.g. passport, insurance papers, birth certificate) so that you can take them with you when you move. Language courses: If you’re not already fluent, then consider taking a course in your host country’s...
16 July 2019

6 steps to starting a professional career abroad: Part 3

(From ec.europa.eu ) Step #5: Moving abroad Moving abroad is a big step, but with a bit of planning you can smooth the transition and make the process less intimidating. What should I think about before moving? Work contract: You should receive a copy of your employment contract and confirmation of your salary before you leave. Important documentation: Make copies of your important documents (e.g. passport, insurance papers, birth certificate) so that you can take them with you when you move. Language courses: If you’re not already fluent, then consider taking a course in your host country’s...
02 July 2019

6 steps to starting a professional career abroad: Part 1

(From ec.europa.eu ) Step #1: Finding information on jobs abroad There are lots of job portals, websites and employment services out there, so it’s likely that t European employers use different ones. While you can visit individual sites, there are also a number of European-level organisations and websites to give you a helping hand. Public employment services and EURES: It’s likely that there’s a local or regional employment office in your area. They’re a great source of advice and there may also be a EURES Staff member based there who can provide personalised one-to-one assistance. . EURES...
26 June 2019

Going Dutch: tips for working in the Netherlands

(From ec.europa.eu ) Unemployment is falling in the Netherlands as the economy recovers, and while the number of government jobs is set to fall due to cuts, employment in the private sector is rising. While there is little demand for low-skilled workers, there is a shortage of applicants for medium-skilled jobs and therefore a good chance of finding work in a number of technical occupations. These roles include CNC machine operators, specialist welders and industrial pipe fitters, while design engineers, technically qualified project managers and R&D specialists are also in demand. There...
08 May 2019

Let’s work in Germany

(From ec.europa.eu ) The EURES portal contains lots of information about living and working in the EU, with country-by-country facts and figures just a click away. EURES wants to be your first point of contact for support in finding a job in another EU country, and can direct you to the most appropriate sources of help. A good information source beside the EURES website for jobseekers who want to find work in Germany is www.make-it-in-germany.com , the German federal government’s website for foreign qualified professionals. It has versions in English, French and Spanish, with limited...
23 April 2019

‘Incredible places and wonderful people’: Lara’s story

(From ec.europa.eu ) ‘It all started with my registration on the EURES platform,’ recalls Lara. ‘It’s a simple procedure, similar to that of any other online job search platform. Basically, it involves entering your CV. You can also filter the offers you want to receive depending on the type of work.’ Lara soon received a job offer from a hotel in the Moselle valley region of Germany, although she admits that she wasn’t sure about the offer at first, because the employer wanted her to start work quickly. ‘I had nothing to lose’ Lara decided to contact a EURES Adviser at the Servicio Extremeño...
16 April 2019

Social media: A job hunting tool?

(From ec.europa.eu ) LinkedIn An article about job hunting on social media could not start without talking about LinkedIn. Launched in 2002, the site is specifically designed for professional networking and recruitment. There are a variety of tools and features on offer, and we’ve pulled out some of our favourites. Join groups: An obvious one, but a logical place to start. There are over 1.7 million groups on LinkedIn, dedicated not just to individual companies but also to networking, organisations and specific themes. Joining a group will give you access to experts, people who have the same...
21 January 2019

Skills for Jobs: How to get the most out of the OECD’s database

(From ec.europa.eu ) The world of work is changing amid technological developments and globalisation. For employees and employers, it’s important to know which skills are in demand – and in excess – in certain countries and occupations. This is where the Skills for Jobs database comes in. What is the Skills for Jobs database? Launched in 2017 by the OECD, Skills for Jobs provides information on skills shortages and surpluses in 40 countries, as well as occupational imbalances. It looks at cognitive, social and physical skills, and can help you understand which skills are hard to find and...
07 January 2019

Four common workplace personalities and how to work effectively with them

(From ec.europa.eu ) Everyone is different. We all have our own thoughts, experiences, beliefs and cultures. While this variety definitely makes life more interesting and exciting, it can be a bit of a stumbling block within the workplace when these differences collide. Learning how to work effectively with your colleagues and how to balance their personalities with yours is an important part of working life. The Leader Who are they? Leaders are usually very ambitious, driven and confident individuals. They’re the type of people that take control of a situation, make clear decisions and you’...

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